ACTIVE RANGE AREA
The active range area for Skeet and Trapshooting fields includes the area of the shooting stations and trap houses. It also includes the area forward of the shooting stations to a depth equivalent to the flight distance of the thrown targets, which is approximately 65 m.

This area should be relatively level and free of tall brush, trees or any other major obstructions.

SKEET RANGE
Range Configuration
A Skeet field has two houses, a "high" and a "low" house, from which targets are thrown. These houses are located at either end of a segment on a circle having a radius of 19.2 m. Seven shooting stations are located on this circle segment. An eighth shooting station is situated in the centre of the field, midway between the high and low houses; refer to Figure 31: Typical Skeet Range Layout.


Figure 31: Typical Skeet Range Layout


Skeet Houses
Skeet houses are located on opposite sides of the skeet field. The high house is at the left end and the low house is at the right end of field, separated by approximately 38.8 m (refer to Figures 31: Typical Skeet Range Layout and 32: Skeet Range). These structures are used to house target throwing mechanisms and target supplies, if desired.

On range facilities with adjacent Skeet fields, the skeet houses can be configured as joint high and low houses.

Figure 32: Skeet Range


The exterior of the skeet houses can be painted beige or an off-white colour so that the thrown targets can be more readily seen by the shooters.

Skeet houses are designed to accommodate either manual or self-loading traps. Critical dimensions (e.g. height or width) for these houses are user, or sport governing body, specified. Construction details can usually be obtained directly from the sport governing body, from trap manufacturers or ammunition manufacturers.

Unmanned skeet house construction shall be user specified.

Skeet houses with manually operated target throwers require human operators. Construction requirements for this type of skeet house are specified below and are intended to protect the operator.

  1. The side and back walls, including a door if present, of the skeet house:
    • Shall be pellet-proof in the operator's work area to a height of 2.5 m above the floor;
    • If the construction is of normal wood frame, it shall be overlaid with two overlapped layers of 5 cm (nominal) thick planking or construction that meets or exceeds this requirement; and,
    • If the construction is concrete or cinder block, no additional protection is required.
  2. If the trap operator is visible in their normal operating position from Stations 1, 7 or 8, there shall be a sheet metal chute affixed to the exterior of the skeet house to protect the operator from misdirected shot pellets. This chute shall be configured so that the operator, in their normal operating position, is not exposed to pellets fired into the skeet house from any shooting station.
  3. Excluding the doorway and the opening through which skeet are thrown, there shall be no windows or openings into the operator's area of the skeet house.
  4. There shall be a prominently displayed warning sign inside the operator's area of the skeet house instructing the operator:
    • Not to look out of the skeet chute when the range is operating;
    • Not to reach into the skeet chute when the range is operating; and,
    • Not to leave the sheltered operator's area of the skeet house until given permission by the Range Officer.



Each manually operated skeet house is to be equipped with a YELLOW flag (approximately 30 cm x 45 cm) mounted to a short pole. This flag is intended to be used by the skeet house operator to signal to the Range Officer and shooters when shooting must be stopped (e.g. trap breakdown or target supply exhausted).



Shooting Stations
The shooting stations of the skeet range must:

  • Be clearly marked; and
  • Be level and provide firm footing for the shooters under adverse weather conditions. The use of gravel, asphalt or concrete pads/pathways is recommended.


It is recommended that the shooting stations be approximately 90 cm square (e.g. 90 cm x 90 cm).

The typical arrangement of shooting stations is shown in Figure 31: Typical Skeet Range Layout. The specific positioning of these stations shall be in accordance with sport governing rules. A field firing skeet range is shown in

Figure 33: Field Firing Skeet Range.



Skeet Target Mechanisms
The target-throwing mechanisms shall be functional (refer to the Safety Considerations guidelines) and capable of throwing the targets reliably on the intended flight path. Maintaining consistency of target flight direction and height is an important consideration for a Skeet field. To assist in verifying target flight, a stake or post should mark the crossing point for targets thrown from the high and the low houses. This stake should be located approximately 5.5 m forward of Station No. 8.

The shooting boundaries should also be marked with posts or stakes placed at 40.25 m from each skeet house. This distance is measured in a straight line from each skeet house through the crossing point.

The traps should be adjusted to obtain target flight paths in accordance with the sport governing body's rules.


As an example, ATA rules require the traps to reliably throw the targets from the low and high houses through a 0.9 m (approximately) diameter hoop located 4.6 m (approximately) above the crossing point; refer to Figure 31: Typical Skeet Range Layout.


Barrier Wall - Adjacent Skeet Ranges
In situations where two or more Skeet fields are adjoining, they shall be separated by a barrier wall. This wall is intended to protect shooters on adjoining ranges from errant targets and misdirected shots. The barrier wall shall meet or exceed the construction requirements; refer to Figure 34: Skeet Range Barrier Fence.

Figure 34: Skeet Range Barrier Fence


TRAPSHOOTING RANGE
Range Configuration
A standard ATA Trapshooting range has a single target house, located forward of a series of shooting stations, configured in a triangular shape; refer to Figure 35: Typical Trap Field Layout.

Figure 35: Typical Trap Field Layout



Trap Houses
The trap house is located in accordance with Figure 35: Typical Trap Field Layout. The purpose of this structure is to house target throwing traps and target supplies.

Trap houses are designed to accommodate either manually operated or self-loading traps. The floor area of a typical trap house is approximately 2.4 m square. The trap house can be built on grade, or with part or all of it below grade. The necessary dimensions for the trap houses (e.g. height and width) are user, or sport governing body, specified. Refer to Figure 36: Sample Trap House for an example of one style of trap house. Unmanned trap house construction can be user specified.

Figure 36: Sample Trap House



Trap houses with manual traps require human operators. Construction requirements for this type of trap house are specified below. The primary concern of these requirements is the protection of the operator.

  1. The exposed roof, side and back walls of the trap house shall be pellet-proof. They shall be constructed of 10 cm thick poured concrete, or of a construction design that meets this requirement (e.g. cinder block). It is recommended that the roof be of a reinforced concrete design.
  2. There shall be no windows or openings on the sides or rear of the trap house.
  3. There shall be a prominently placed warning sign inside the operator's area of the trap house instructing the operator not to emerge from the trap house until given permission by the Range Officer.


Each manually operated trap house shall be equipped with a YELLOW flag (approximately 30 cm x 45 cm), mounted to a short pole. This flag is to be used by the trap operator to signal to the Range Officer and shooters that shooting must be stopped (e.g. trap breakdown or target supply exhausted).


Shooting Stations
The shooting stations of the trapshooting field must:

  • Be clearly marked; and.
  • Be level and provide firm footing for the shooters under adverse weather conditions. The use of gravel, concrete or asphalt pads/pathways is recommended.


It is recommended that the shooting stations be approximately 90 cm square. The typical arrangement of shooting stations is shown in Figure 35: Typical Trap Field Layout.


Trap Target Throwing Mechanisms
The target throwing mechanisms shall be functional as described in the Safety Considerations guidelines.


FIELD FIRING SKEET RANGE
Range Configuration
This type of ad hoc Skeet range is very simple to construct and operate. It consists of a manually powered and operated target thrower or a mechanical trap, and one or more shooting stations; refer to Figure 33: Field Firing Skeet Range.



Shooting stations
The shooting stations of the field firing Skeet range must:

  • Be clearly marked;
  • Shall be abreast of the target thrower; and,
  • Be level and provide firm footing for the shooters under adverse weather conditions. The use of gravel, concrete or asphalt pads/pathways is recommended.


It is recommended that the shooting stations be at least 90 cm square.


Trap Mechanisms
The mechanical traps shall be functional as described in the Safety Considerations guidelines.

If a manual target thrower is utilized, the operator shall be familiar with its operation and aware of the limits of the safety area.